Workshop

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Jun
8
6:30 PM18:30

Mother-Son Incest: The Unthinkable Broken Taboo

"Mother-Son Incest: The Unthinkable Broken Taboo"

Hani Miletski, PhD, MSW

Based on a book by the same title (Miletski, 2007), this workshop will provide an overview of existing information on this rarely discussed and published issue. Dr. Hani Miletski suggests that the mother-son incest taboo is not as strong as society’s denial of its existence. She seeks to explore this denial and to increase awareness of mother-son incest among professionals, since lack of knowledge and awareness prevents us from identifying victims and perpetrators, and from providing effective treatment interventions. 
Dr. Miletski will discuss and challenge five misconceptions which contribute to society’s denial: (1) mother-son incest occurs only when intercourse is involved; (2) boys cannot be victims of sexual abuse; (3) sexual abuse is perpetrated only by men; (4) motherly love is free of sexual intentions; and (5) mother-son incest occurs only when at least one of the parties is mentally ill.

This will be a philosophical presentation, aimed at challenging the audience and pushing participants to look inside themselves, to identify and encounter their personal barriers to recognizing mother-son incest, and to begin a discussion about this important topic. Participants will be encouraged to share stories and to take an active part in the discussion.

Hani Miletski is a psychotherapist in private practice in Bethesda, Maryland with over 20 years of clinical experience. She is certified as a Diplomate of Sex Therapy and as a Sex Therapy Supervisor by the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors, and Therapists (AASECT), has trained and supervised therapists and professionals in the field of human sexuality throughout the world, and has presented at various national and international conferences. She is the author of Mother-Son Incest: The Unthinkable Broken Taboo Persists, Understanding Bestialtiy and Zoophilia, and a variety of other articles and chapters in the professional literature. She is a licensed clinical social worker and has a Doctorate in Human Sexuality from the Institute for the Advanced Study of Human Sexuality. Dr. Miletski was born in Israel and served in the Israeli Defense Forces as an officer before coming to the US at the age of 24.

*This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs and LCSWs.

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May
18
6:30 PM18:30

A Trans-Psychoanalyst Questioning Harris’s "Gender As Soft Assembly" In Men’s Locker Rooms. The Rebirth Of Shame

"A Trans-Psychoanalyst Questioning Harris’s Gender As Soft Assembly In Men’s Locker Rooms. The Rebirth Of Shame."

Luc Olivier Charlap, PhD

This paper will attempt to address the experience of transitioning later in life and the impact of female socialization in everyday life on this male identified transgender psychoanalyst. Despite valid efforts to maintain a sense of gender fluidity, society’s unrelenting call for a binary expression of gender has never been so stark. Society’s lack of “gender mentalization” and its insistence on defensively and unconsciously concretizing it, as it threatens basic organizing principles, reintroduce a sense of shame, shame which I meant to escape in the first place. I am now hiding in fear of misrecognition, in a new way. Yes, gender as an internal experience, is a soft assembly, but in everyday encounters it is mostly rigidified and concrete. Going through multiple gendered/ungendered self states, I experience this most vividly, since I now pass as male, in men’s locker rooms that I am now required to use. Using Harris, Orange and Bromberg I will discuss this forced return and unrequited adoption of the binary and its psychic implications in terms of gender, mentalization, shame and trauma- in seemingly benign exposures to everyday encounters such as in the bare exclusivity of male only spaces.

Dr. Luc Olivier Charlap PhD is a psychoanalyst in private practice in New York City. As a faculty member of various psychoanalytic institute he has taught classes on Trauma and its Treatment; Gender and Sexuality; Object Relations; Klein; and Envy, Narcissism and Borderlines Conditions. He is also a faculty member at NYU Silver School of Social Work. At present, as a faculty member and training analyst at the Contemporary Institute of Psychotherapy, he teaches in the Four-Year psychoanalytic program and supervises psychoanalytic candidates.

*This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs and LCSWs.

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May
4
6:30 PM18:30

When the Body Speaks: An Introduction to Somatic Psychotherapy

"When the Body Speaks: An Introduction to Somatic Psychotherapy"

Amy Gladstone, LCSW, Ph.D

Many of the current clinical models of practice emphasize the role of present moment experience in therapeutic action. The body contains the roots of past experience in present time. When clinicians learn how to pay attention they discover that the body provides a new pathway to access hard-to-reach implicit material and an opportunity for profound experiences of healing.

In this workshop, Dr. Gladstone will give a brief introduction to somatic psychotherapy as it augments and deepens clinical practice. She will focus on techniques and demonstrate her work as a somatic psychotherapist using clinical examples. Participants will leave with a sense of how to integrate information from the body into clinical talk therapy. 

Amy Gladstone, LCSW, Ph.D. is a clinician, educator, supervisor, and workshop leader with over 25 years of clinical experience who presents locally and nationally on affect regulation, attachment and experiential methods. She is on the faculty of the Integrative Trauma Program of the National Institute for the Psychotherapies and the Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute. Certified in both Somatic Experiencing and Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, trained in EMDR and IFS, Dr. Gladstone is an integrative psychotherapist.
 

*This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs and LCSWs.

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Apr
27
6:30 PM18:30

On Safari With Blue Gazelle: Escapades Between Ego and Unconscious

"On Safari With Blue Gazelle: Escapades Between Ego and Unconscious"

Michael Jenkins, LCSW

By presenting a series of dreams and the Jungian practice of active imagination in response to these dreams, we will entertain questions of creative unconscious and its impact on consciousness. This presentation is open to all dreamers (even those who don't remember). 

How does our ability to incorporate imagination and creativity enhance our ability to meet life’s challenges? This presentation will focus on the relationship of the ego to the unconscious; individual stuck points and how they impact self awareness; importance of familial/cultural/religious/political influence; how these impact creativity and a fuller life experience. We will look at how lack of imagination impacts limited choice and how imagination encourages freedom and possibility.

Imagination is a psychic drive vital to life force and productivity. How can it get stymied and how can we loosen it up in practice? What is its importance to resilience and overcoming both internal and external threat? How can we work with developing imaginative process and power in our psyche analytic work?

There will be several suggested readings on imagination from a multi-cultural and trauma related perspective. This will serve to introduce some concepts to be discussed in this workshop.

Michael Jenkins, Certificate in Psychoanalysis, Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Study Center; LCSW, Masters Degree in Social Work, NYU; Faculty, Supervisor, Psychoanalyst at PPSC and New York Counseling and Guidance Services. Michael Jenkins is an exhibiting artist and maintains a private practice in New York City.

*This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs and LCSWs.

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Apr
13
6:30 PM18:30

The Changing Face of Empathy: Harnessing Unconscious Resonance in the Countertransference

“The Changing Face of Empathy: Harnessing Unconscious Resonance in the Countertransference”

Janine de Peyer, LCSW-R

Can our clients sense when we’re bored, distrustful, envious, or downright disgusted? To what degree are our ‘private’ countertransference reactions perceived, both consciously and unconsciously, and what can we do about it? This presentation delves into the unconscious influence of internally harbored reactions to our clients, both positive and negative. Self-reflective work in-between sessions can shift negative countertransference reactions, but are such shifts unconsciously perceptible to the client? If the client unconsciously perceives a shift in us, is it possible that this perception can be registered, mind-to-mind, in the relational unconscious, before he/she walks even back into the room with us? In other words, what is the reach of dyadic, right hemisphere-to-right hemisphere communication?

As theories of empathy evolve, discoveries of mirror neurons, perceptual encoding, emotional contagion, and social brain activation challenge us to consider neurological, physiological, cognitive, and dissociative levels of mental interpenetration. Where does empathy stand in relation to all this? What differentiates emotional contagion from empathic responsiveness, or ‘affective empathy’ from ‘cognitive empathy?’ How do we separate mutually projective unconscious processes from activation of our own personal history, and how does all this affect our capacity for compassion?

Through clinical illustration, a method for shifting negative countertransference will be presented through the cultivation of identificatory empathy and self-forgiveness. When the analyst identifies and releases correlations to the client’s traumas, unconscious resonance will occur. We will integrate theories of the relational unconscious, self-state sharing, mirror neuron exchange, unified field theory, and the wisdom of psycho/spiritual healing practices.

In a sociopolitical climate where empathy is sorely lacking, practices designed to develop the capacity for empathy will also be proposed, including introduction to innovative Virtual Reality technology.

Janine de Peyer, LCSW is Faculty and Supervisor at the National Institute for the Psychothera- pies, and the Stephen Mitchell Relational Study Center where she teaches on clinical process and transference-countertransference dynamics. She is Associate Editor with Psychoanalytic Dia- logues, and has published multiple papers on dissociation and unconscious communication. Janine’s recent articles include Uncanny Communication and the Porous Mind, (2016, Psycho- analytic Dialogues), Byron-Beguiled, (2017, Psychoanalytic Perspectives), and Traversing the Ineffable: Commentary on Sharon Farber’s “Becoming a Telepathic Tuning Fork” (2017, Psychoanalytic Dialogues). Janine integrates EMDR and creative visualization within a relational psychoanalytic framework. She is in private practice in Manhattan. 

*This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs and LCSWs.

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Mar
16
6:30 PM18:30

Woman is Perfect: A Discussion of Hilda Doolittle's Analysis with Freud and a Close Reading of Her Poem, The Master

"Woman is Perfect": A Discussion of Hilda Doolittle's Analysis with Freud and a Close Reading of Her Poem, The Master

Paul Geltner, DSW and Mary Wallach, MFA, LCSW

In 1933, H. D. (Hilda Doolittle), a great Modernist writer, started an analysis with Freud because she was unable to write and wanted "to free herself from repetitive thoughts and experiences". She left with her creative powers unblocked. Afterwards, H. D. wrote two prose books about the experience. And a magnificent poem -- The Master -- which describes both her passionate disagreements with Freud and her profound appreciation for their relationship, and celebrates the feeling of powerful, creative womanhood that she acquired in the course of the analysis.

Paul Geltner will discuss aspects of H.D.'s life and her analysis — an analytic relationship that reveals a side of Freud’s clinical work seldom found in his writings or other patients’ memoirs: moments of emotional availability, vulnerability, and transparency, his openness to a gender-fluid, bisexual woman, and the creativity of his technique compared to the parsimonious rules he recommended to others. 

Mary Wallach will read The Master and lead a stanza by stanza discussion of the poem.

Dr. Paul Geltner. is the author of Emotional Communication: Countertransference Analysis and the Use of Feeling in Psychoanalytic Technique, and of papers on dreams and child analysis. He has has been the Director of Psychoanalytic Education at the Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Study Center, and has taught Northern Rockies Psychoanalytic Institute, Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies, and the Colorado Center for Modern Psychoanalysis. He is in private practice in New York City, working with individuals and couples. He specializes in individual and group supervision with psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists.

Mary Wallach, M.F.A., L.C.S.W., is in private practice in New York City where she practices both psychoanalytic and EMDR psychotherapy. She has published papers on poetry and psychoanalysis inThe Journal of The American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry and has presented on this topic at the PPSC Annex and the Artist Study Group at The William Alanson White Institute. She also holds a M.F.A. in Writing from Columbia University and has published poetry in the American Philosophical Association Newsletter of Philosophy and Medicine, Shangri-la Shack, The Mississippi Review, Mockingheart Review and other journals. She is available for poetry workshops and readings

*This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs and LCSWs.

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Mar
2
6:30 PM18:30

The Present in Couples Therapy: Moments of Transformation

“The Present in Couples Therapy: Moments of Transformation”

Mary-Joan Gerson, PhD

This presentation will describe an approach to couples therapy which integrates psychoanalytic, systemic and attachment theory. I link my approach to the emphasis on therapeutic moments as delineated by the Boston Change Process Group, with a particular focus on implicit knowing and “fittedness”. Three key aspects of this perspective on couples therapy are: 1) unexpected recognition; 2) inextricable linking and 3) the power of mutual healing.

Mary-Joan Gerson, Ph.D., ABPP, is an Adjunct Clinical Professor, Consultant in Psychoanaysis, and has served as the Director of the Advanced Specialization in Couple and Family Therapy at the New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, and Co-Chair of the Pro Bono and Activism Committee. She is a supervisor at the National Institute for the Psychotherapies and a faculty member at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

An active leader in Division 39 (Psychoanalysis) of the American Psychological Association, she was the Founding President of Section VIII, Couple and Family Therapy, as well as the Founding Co-Chair of the Committee on Psychoanalysis and Health Care, and the Committee on Psychoanalysis and Community and received the Division 39 Leadership Award in 2016.

Dr. Gerson has taught, presented nationally and internationally, and published widely on the integration of psychoanalytic, family systemic and attachment theory, as well as how intimate and work relationships affect coping with chronic medical illness. She is the author of many articles and book chapters, as well a full length book, The Embedded Self: An Integrated Psychodynamic and Systemic Perspective on Couple and Family Therapy.

*This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs and LCSWs.

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Feb
23
6:30 PM18:30

Emails, Texts and Beyond: Communicating Analytically in the Digital Age

"Emails, Texts and Beyond: Communicating Analytically in the Digital Age"

Valerie Frankfeldt, PhD

It’s a wondrous new world! Technology gives us unparalleled abilities to connect. Technology adds a level of efficiency and convenience that makes life so much easier, both in and outside of therapy. 

On the other hand, when is a request to plug a phone charger in our outlet based in “reality”? When is it a disguised sexual request--or assault? How do we feel about being digitally available to patients when they have a brief piece of news to report? What happens when it’s not so brief and it’s late Saturday night? Can patients perhaps express things by email that need to be said but that cannot safely be said in person because it would make them feel too vulnerable? Would it be useful if they could express rage without fear of immediate in-person reprisal? Or might it be a shortcut that interferes with the crucial work of analyzing resistance? Would it be helpful for us to watch that video of the patient’s child’s first steps? Would it be an enactment, or no? How about learning that the patient is pregnant, or has cancer, or wants to end treatment, that comes through in a text? What is the effect on the therapist? How do we view these contacts psychoanalytically? And how do we deal with them in the room?

This workshop will provide a forum to grapple with the myriad dilemmas posed by our patients’ as well as our own use of email and texts as they impact the treatment situation. Participants are invited to bring in struggles with incorporating (or resisting) the use of texts, email and devices in treatment.

Valerie Frankfeldt, LCSW, PhD is the Director of Training, a faculty member, training analyst and supervisor at PPSC. She is a Certified Imago Relationship Therapist, and a graduate of the Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies. She has written extensively on psychoanalytic/12 Step/Harm Reduction treatment of addictions, mother-child problematic interactions and their healing, work with severely disturbed patients, and incongruent feeling states between analyst and patient. She is in private practice in Greenwich Village, NY

*This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs and LCSWs.

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Feb
2
6:30 PM18:30

Attachment Trauma and Split Off Sexual Lives In Systemic Sex Therapy

"Attachment Trauma and Split Off Sexual Lives in Systemic Sex Therapy"

Sari Cooper, LCSW

Friday, February 2, 2018 

6:30 PM to 8:30 PM

 

PPSC

80 Fifth Avenue

Room 1408

New York, New York 10011

This talk will present the clinical challenges facing a therapist when a client’s past relational trauma infiltrates their partnered sexual lives. Case examples will be presented along with information gleaned from sexual histories to offer systemic hypotheses and interventions used to help couples create a more authentic, attached erotic life that has a felt-sense of vitality.


This talk will be of help to both general therapists who may need more education around sexual issues and sex therapists who want a reboot or are looking for alternative conceptualizations and clinical techniques for couples systemic treatment. Many therapists find themselves stymied when faced with the avoidance, conflict or post-infidelity crisis wrought by years of neglect or denial of the trauma legacy within the relationship. The workshop will include references to clinical case examples, techniques and home exercises, as well as research that can be illuminating for therapists and their clients.

Sari Cooper is a licensed individual, couples, and AASECT-Certified sex therapist and clinical supervisor who has been in private practice for over 25 years. She has been committed to helping people connect more authentically in their emotional and sexual relationships and is the Founder and Director of the Center for Love and Sex in NYC, which specializes in treating sexual issues for individuals and couples. She also offers live and recorded workshops and webinars for professionals that provide continuing education credits. In addition Sari is an internationally recognized expert who has been called upon to comment on sexuality and relationships on many media outlets including: CBS This Morning, The Better Show and Dr. Oz, The Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, Greatest, Vice, Bustle, Cosmo, Lifehacker, Barron’s, New York Post, and Marie Claire. Furthermore, she writes for Psychology Today and Huffngton Post and has her own blog, Sex Esteem®, and her own web show, Sex Esteem® with Sari Cooper.

*This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs and LCSWs.

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Mar
18
6:30 PM18:30

Finding The Sex You Lost: Transforming Limiting Beliefs

  • PPSC, 80 Fifth Ave, Suite 903A NY, NY 10011 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs & LCSWs. Lecture will led by Sylvia Rosenfeld LCSW.

This workshop will explore how the repressive and conflicting messages we receive from family, religion, and culture, whether explicitly related to our sexuality or not, limit our potential for sexual feeling, meaning, curiosity, communication, empathy, and pleasure. The Imago concept of the Lost Self will be discussed to show how these messages impact our core sexual self, our choice of partner and our erotic dance in relationship. Through lecture and experiential exercises participants will explore the messages that dictate sex-negative myths and beliefs. They will leave with tools for helping their clients reclaim their sexual selves, and expand their sexual repertoire.

Learning objectives- At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

1. List at least four ways negative cultural/familial beliefs and messages impact sexual pleasure and satisfaction.

2. Utilize 2-3 tools that can help their clients reclaim their sexual self, and expand their sexual repertoire.

Sylvia Rosenfeld LCSW is an Imago trained, AASECT certified sex therapist with more than 35 years working with couples and individuals who want to enhance their sexual and emotional connection. Sylvia trained with the late Dr. Helen Singer Kaplan at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, Dr. Harville Hendrix, and completed level two PACT training with Dr. Stan Tatkin. Sylvia’s work extends to supervising therapists in the area of relationship and sexual issues. Additionally, she leads professional workshops for therapists, mental health practitioners and health professionals in general. Website- Sylviarosenfeld.com

To register for this event - http://www.eventbrite.com/o/the-ppsc-annex-

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Feb
26
6:30 PM18:30

Versing the Analyst and Patient in Sound and Silence: Deadness, Aliveness and Transformative Truth

  • PPSC, 80 Fifth Ave, Suite 903A NY, NY 10011 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs & LCSWs. Lecture will be led by Mary Wallach, MFA, LCSW.

Only a poem can talk about what we could not have imagined without the poem.—James Tate.

In Promises, Promises: Psychoanalysis and Literature, Adam Phillips asks, “If the analyst were to aim to be more like a poet than a scientist, what would his work be like? What would he be wanting of and from his patient?” In this lively, power-point presentation, psychotherapist/poet Mary Wallach will define and identify what “poetic thinking” is and discuss how poetry teaches us about communication, imagination, metaphor and process in psychoanalytic practice and theory. Following Thomas Ogden’s observation that “poetry is a great disciplinarian to analytic listening,” she will demonstrate how both successful poetry and analysis share elements of structure, language, paradox and surprise.

In addition, we will be reading and comparing two contemporary American poems from Mary’s paper, Listening to Oedipus:  Two Poems by Sons about Fathers: “The Lost Pilot” by James Tate (1991)  and “Waving Goodbye to My Father” by Michael Blumenthal (1997) .  It is recommended that you read these poems out loud in order to savor the shifts in tone, rhythm and sense of the words.  Focus on sounds and silence that occur in your reading, as much as the meaning.

Mary Wallach, MFA, LCSW completed, a Masters Degree Social Work at Hunter College and post-graduate training at the Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Study CenterShe received a Masters in Fine Art in Writing at Columbia University. Her poems have appeared in The Mississippi Review, Cider Press Review, The Shangri-la Shack, The Road Not Taken and other publications.

To register for this event - http://www.eventbrite.com/o/the-ppsc-annex-575950629

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Dec
18
1:30 PM13:30

Ferenczi’s “The Unwelcome Child and His Death Instinct” and the Concept of Anaclitic Emotional Communication

  • PPSC, 80 Fifth Ave, Suite 903A NY, NY 10011 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs & LCSWs. Lecture will be led by Dr. Paul Geltner.

Sandor Ferenczi’s short, powerful paper was the first psychoanalytic discussion of the feelings that a person needs to experience from the parents in order to develop a zest for life and it also offers a few hints of how to work with patients who have not experienced those feelings. Paul Geltner will present a close reading of this classic paper, and then discuss the concept of anaclitic emotional communication: the idea that many patients will re-experience these needs in the psychoanalytic relationship and that the analyst can meet many of these needs within the context of the transference. He will also discuss the types of countertransference the analyst experiences in the countertransference in these, both the distinctive feelings of boredom and hopelessness when the patient re-experiences the deprivation of these needs and the more nurturing feelings when the patient is receptive to having these needs met by the analyst.

Dr. Paul Geltner is the author of Emotional Communication: Countertransference Analysis and the Use of Feeling in Psychoanalytic Technique (Routledge, 2013) and of papers on dreams and child analysis. He has has been the Director of Psychoanalytic Education at the Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Study Center, and has taught at the Northern Rockies Psychoanalytic Institute, the Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies, and the Colorado Center for Modern Psychoanalysis. He is in private practice in New York City, working with individuals and couples. He specializes in individual and group supervision with psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists.

To register for this event  - http://www.eventbrite.com/o/the-ppsc-annex-

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Dec
4
1:30 PM13:30

Therapeutic Writing: Memoir As a Tool for Reflection, Processing, and Discovery

  • PPSC, 80 Fifth Ave, Suite 903A NY, NY 10011 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs & LCSWs. Lecture will be led by Sarah Saffian, LMSW, MFA.

To Register - https://www.eply.com/APATFall20151281525

In this interactive event, Sarah Saffian will present the Therapeutic Writing model, a creative hybrid that can serve as a useful complement to traditional individual talk therapy. With a nod to the approaches of psychologists like James Pennebaker (University of Texas, author of Writing to Heal: A Guided Journal for Recovering from Trauma and Emotional Upheaval) and Timothy Wilson (University of Virginia, author of Redirect: Changing the Stories We Live By), and drawing from her own evolution from memoirist, to memoir teacher, to therapist, Sarah uses writing exercises to encourage deeper, clearer reflection, processing of issues, and discovery. Whether in groups or individual treatment, the memoir prompts can translate to virtually any issue — while the exercises offer frames, the clients provide the particular content to examine through them.

In her presentation, Sarah will chart her own professional journey, including a brief reading from her memoir, Ithaka, explaining what inspired her to blend her areas of interest and expertise in creating and employing this model. She’ll share the similarities and also crucial differences between craft-oriented and therapeutic workshops, where the focus is introspective. And she’ll offer up a brief writing exercise or two to the audience — such as a letter to yourself, exploration of different perspectives on an incident, experimentation with verb tenses to variously access a situation — followed by sharing and discussion.

SARAH SAFFIAN, LMSW, MFA, is a writer, a teacher, and a therapist. Her memoir, Ithaka,  (Basic Books, 1998; Dell, 1999) chronicles the experience of being an adoptee who was found by her birth family. She teaches memoir at the Iowa Summer Writing Festival and Sarah Lawrence, and works independently as a writing coach. As a therapist, she counsels individual clients and runs support groupswith Spence-Chapin Services, the Infertility and Adoption Counseling Center, (IAC), and in various private practice settings in Manhattan and Brooklyn. Her clinical experience also includes New York University’s Counseling and Wellness Services. Sarah earned her BA in English from Brown, her MFA in creative writing from Columbia, and her MSW from NYU. Please visit: saffian.com.

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Nov
20
6:30 PM18:30

Relationships: What is the Glue that Holds People Together, For Better and for Worse?

This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs & LCSWs. Lecture will led by Valerie Frankfeldt, PhD, LCSW.

As therapists we sometimes have to scratch our heads watching couples or hearing about individuals in relationships compulsively hurting, or even destroying, each other. We wonder, “This is not a match made in heaven; why stay together?” This workshop answers that question, and provides some tools for working with these problems.

Committed relationships involve a developmental process that recapitulates in an adult form the developmental process of individuals. Stress between partners is a recapitulation of the developmental arrests of each partner. The developmental arrest in each partner is similar or identical to that in the others. Adaptations are complementary. Stress between partners is an externalization of internal stress and conflict in each partner, played out in the interpersonal arena of the relationship.

This will be a didactic and experiential presentation, with participants doing a written exercise to identify those traits, the life enhancing ones and repetitive ones, that “hook” us in our own relationships. For therapists it is also of interest to use the exercise to identify how certain patient traits push our buttons, both positively and negatively.
Valerie Frankfeldt, LCSW, PhD, is a faculty member, training analyst and supervisor, and Chair of the Training Committee at PPSC. Dr. Frankfeldt is a graduate of the Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies, and is a Certified Imago Relationship Therapist. In spite of the theory , she can still be found scratching her head in wonder at how people find and keep each other.

Valerie Frankfeldt, PhD, LCSW will lead the lecture.

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Nov
15
7:00 PM19:00

What is Focusing? Getting in Touch With What is Beyond the Spoken Word Lynn Preston, MA, MS, LP

What is it that makes some therapy sessions alive and compelling and others lifeless and dull? We may say that the enlivening sessions are with patients who are “in touch with their feelings.” But what does this “in-touchiness” entail and how do we facilitate it when it is absent?

Focusing, an approach developed by philosopher Eugene Gendlin, is a way of opening the therapeutic moment to the unformulated, not-quite-conscious undercurrents of felt meaning that are beneath the surface of all our thinking and speaking. He calls this implicit intricacy. Access to this feeling level isthe life force of therapeutic momentum. By becoming sensitized to its presence, we can harness its transformational potential.

In this workshop participants will be introduced to the “how to” of using focusing in psychotherapy. Through didactic exploration and live clinical demonstration we will explore:
• Listening for and bringing awareness to “the more” of what is being talked about
• Sensing into the vast territory of implicit experience that is just beneath
• Getting the deeper point that the patient is trying to get or show
• Enlivening the moment through evocative listening and responding

Lynn Preston, MA, MS, LP, is a focusing-oriented relational psychoanalyst, teacher and supervisor. Lynn is a graduate of the PPSC Advanced Self Psychology program, a faculty member of the Institute of Contemporary Psychotherapy (ICP) and the founding Director of the Experiential Psychotherapy Project (EPP). She has written and presented internationally on the integration of focusing and relational psychoanalysis. She has an abiding interest in experiential teaching and integrative processes.

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Nov
14
1:30 PM13:30

Sexual Desire in Committed Relationships: Short Shelf Life or Multiple Self States

Sexual desire issues are the most frequently reported sexual problems in psychotherapy. How do we best understand the vicissitudes of desire over the lifespan of couples including the decline of desire or discrepancies in desire? How can therapists co-create safe therapeutic space to promote change in one of the most elusive and mysterious of human experiences? We will discuss theory and techniques that help clarify the intrapsychic, interpersonal, developmental, and environmental factors that affect sexual desire. Discussion of case material and countertransference issues will be included.

Suzanne Iasenza, PhD is on the faculties of the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis (ICP) and the Adelphi University Derner Institute’s PostgraduateProgram in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy. She is co-editor of the books Lesbians and Psychoanalysis: Revolutions in Theory and Practice (1995) and Lesbians, Feminism, and Psychoanalysis: The Second Wave (2004)and maintains a private practice in psychotherapy and sex therapy in New York City. Her most recent paper, “What’s Queer About Sex: Expanding Sexual Frames in Theory and Practice” (2010) was published in the journal Family Process.

This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs & LCSWs. Lecturer will be led by Suzanne Iasenza, PhD.

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Oct
30
6:30 PM18:30

Intimate Partner Violence as Transgenerational Trauma and the Creative Role of Activism in Healing

Many psychoanalysts and psychotherapists have experienced transgenerational trauma in the clinical space, but most writing on the topic define it narrowly, focusing on temporally discrete experiences of violence and not on family or gender-based violence. This presentation focuses on a case of intimate partner violence and father-daughter rape through a layered lens of transgenerational gender and racial trauma. It seeks to expand notions of transgenerational trauma to include the violence transmitted within cultural categories of race, class, sexuality and gender, where the intractable repetitions of family violence were interrupted not only through the clinical work but also through the patient’s social justice activism. Integrating activism with the clinical work produced new forms of embodied symbolizations for both the patient and therapist.

Katie Gentile, Ph.D. is Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies and Director of the Gender Studies Program at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. She is the author of the books Creating Bodies: Eating Disorders as Self-Destructive Survival, and the forthcoming The Business of Being Made: Assisted Reproductive Technologies, Time, Bodies both from Routledge. She is currently researching the use of the fetus as a fetish object for the cultural body and personhood amendments. She is a co-editor of Studies in Gender and Sexuality and on the editorial board of Women’s Studies Quarterly. She is on the faculty of New York University’s Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis and in private practice in New York City.

This talk has been approved by New York State for 2 hours of Continuing Education Credit for LMSWs & LCSWs. Lecture led by Katie Gentile, Ph.D.

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Sep
18
6:30 PM18:30

Nostalgia for the Light: A Meditation on the Consciousness of Healing

Is there a such a thing as an “art of mourning”? How do we as clinicians work with our patients’ struggle to “make something” out of what has left them…literally, at a loss. On an ordinary January day, Juliet stumbled upon a film that spoke poetically and practically to these life-and-death issues. The award-winning Chilean documentary “Nostalgia for the Light” (2010), brings together the disparate, but inter-connected, worlds of astronomers, archeologists, and The Women of Calama–-who search for the remains of loved ones killed after Pinochet’s 1973 military coup on September 11, 1973. Under the brilliant skies of the Atacama desert, they reflect upon and search for a past that has been disavowed and hidden. Juliet’s edited film presentation explores the tension between honoring loss and creating a space beyond it, where one might “let go” and experience some kind of healing. To explore these ideas, she turns to Freud’s personal experience and writing on mourning and the work of Chilean Buddhist neuroscientist Francisco Varela to explore different ways of conceptualizing the ego’s experience of loss. In the workshop, she will also pay special attention to the film’s director, Patricio Guzmán, to consider how his artistic creation (or co-creation) embodies the relational “third” as it reshapes the pain, shame and memory of the aggrieved Women of Calama. In closing, she will explore how clinicians and patients contribute to the co-created lived experience of the analytic space to honor traumatic memory, to mourn and, possibly, to heal together.

Juliet Heeg, LCSW-R, is the Chair of the Arts & Analysis Sub-Committee of the PPSC Annex. Juliet presented “Nostalgia for the Light: A Meditation on the Consciousness of Healing” at the 2013 IARPP conference in Santiago, Chile and at The William Alanson White Artist Study Group in Manhattan in June, 2014. Her published writings and interests include the topics of loneliness, happiness, money and pop-culture. She has recently published the second of a series of articles on cancer care within the spa industry: http://www.insidersguidetospas.com/features/mind-body-cancer-care/. Juliet maintains a private practice in Manhattan.

Tickets go on sale at the beginning of each month. To register for an annex lecture, please use the following link: http://www.eventbrite.com/o/the-ppsc-annex-575950629

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